Author Archives: Julie Fraser

Julie Fraser

About Julie Fraser

Julie Fraser is a PhD researcher at the Montaigne Centre. She commenced her PhD research in late 2013 with the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) at Utrecht University. Julie Fraser conducts doctoral research on the role of culture and social institutions in the national implementation of international human rights obligations in Asian and African States.

Montaigne Researchers Present at the Annual Asian Law Institute Conference in Manila, Philippines May 2017

18588815_1680478885312981_6466588618611950346_oThe 14th Asian Law Institute conference was hosted by the College of Law of the University of the Philippines from 18 to 19 May 2017 in Manila. Qiao Cong-rui, Julie Fraser, and Niu Ming, PhD Candidates and researchers with the Montaigne Centre, participated in the conference. The conference brought together academics and professionals from Asia and the world to discuss issues related to the theme “A Uniting Force? – ‘Asian Values’ and the Law.” Over 100 papers were presented relating to this theme, addressing a wide range of legal fields including commercial law, constitutional law, criminal law, and international law. The conference was divided into six sessions and comprised 36 panels. Academics and professionals contributed to the discussions concerning the concept of ‘Asian values’ by looking at legal and institutional arrangements or systems of key Asian countries. 

By Julie Fraser, Qiao Cong-rui, and Ming Niu

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The Rainy Season in Java: Researching the Role of Islamic Law and Institutions in Promoting Women’s Right to Family Planning in Indonesia

blogFraserSix weeks of melting humidity, spicy food, tropical vegetation, and endless traffic. I was in Indonesia to research how women’s reproductive rights and family planning are protected, with a particular focus on the role of Islamic laws and institutions. This is a complex topic, requiring expertise in matters of women’s rights, public health, demographics, and Islamic law. My visit to Indonesia was part of a crash course in all these fields – a type of sink or swim scenario. My experience there highlighted the role of non-state actors in the promotion and protection of human rights, and the need for domestic constituents working within their communities to secure such rights. I chose Indonesia as my case study as it is the largest Muslim state in the world, has strong plural legal systems and Islamic institutions, and has faced barriers in promoting and protecting women’s reproductive rights. As it turned out, Indonesia was an excellent choice, and a good teacher.

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Association of Human Rights Institutes’ Conference on Human Rights and Universality

flag_map_of_serbia_with_kosovo-svgThe Association of Human Rights Institutes (AHRI) held their 16th annual conference on 21-22 September 2015 in Serbia, hosted by the Belgrade Centre for Human Rights.  This blog gives a brief overview of my experiences at the conference. The theme of the conference was Human Rights and Universality, in acknowledgment of the new ways emerging to approach the universality of human rights. This theme reflected on discussions about what are common human values, and how human rights should be interpreted in the different cultural contexts. Continue reading